Completing The EV Conversion Electric Car Conversion

12 Май 2014 | Author: | Комментарии к записи Completing The EV Conversion Electric Car Conversion отключены
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Gas To Electric Conversion Experience At CIT-Day 8

Completing The EV Conversion

Gas To Electric Conversion Buggy — a nice fun EV conversion to do and drive

Day 8 of the Gas to Electric Conversion Experience Course was the day dedicated to completing the EV Conversion. On Day 7. there were a number of things that could not be completed due to various hurdles. Again, various students split of into various groups working on different parts of the EV Conversion. The following activities to complete the EV conversion were done:

battery mounting (battery rack construction);

wiring;

12 volt circuitry; and

what I learned from the Gas (Petrol) to Electric Conversion Experience.

Battery Mounting (Battery Rack Construction)

EV Battery Racks constructed from angle iron welded to the chassis

On Day 7, it had not been decided how the traction batteries should be arranged. A few configurations were considered, but the major concerns were:

will the batteries fit in their configuration;

can the batteries be easily installed and removed;

how accessible are the batteries like to check acid levels and topping up;

It was decided to mount the batteries in a row next to each other behind the front seats. The battery rack design consisted of 3 lengths of angle iron were used and welded to the chassis in a rectangular shape with the panel behind the front seats forming one side of the rectangle. The construction and welding of the battery rack was that professional that it looks like it came out of the factory like that.


Wiring

EV Conversion-All Wired Up

The thick wires we used for the traction circuit (which had a cross sectional area of 90 square millimeters) had to be cut to size and have lugs crimped to their ends. Here is how we wired up the traction circuit:

Negative terminal of traction battery pack was connected to B- terminal on Curtis controller as per the manual for the Curtis 1209B;

A2 on the Curtis controller was connected to A2 on the Series Wound DC Motor as per the manual for the Curtis 1209B;

M- on the Curtis controller was connected to S2 on the Series Wound DC Motor (noting that A2 and S1 on the Series Wound DC Motor were already connected) as per the manual for the Curtis 1209B;

Positive terminal of traction battery pack was connected to B+ terminal on Curtis controller (not ideal as the fuse does not protect the Curtis controller see below for more details);

B+ terminal on Curtis controller was connected to the 200 amp fuse. The other end of the 200 amp fuse was connected to a high current terminal of the contactor. The other high current terminal of the contactor was connected to  A1 on the Series Wound DC Motor. This is not an ideal set up, but due to a shortage of lugs and not having a fuse holder, it was done this way;

It would have been ideal if we had a fuse holder for the 200amp fuse and if we had more lugs. The ideal way to wire up the traction circuit would have been as per the manual for the Curtis 1209B controller and the way we should have done it is as follows:

Positive terminal from traction battery pack should have been connected to one end of the 200 amp fuse instead of B+ of the Curtis controller;

The other end of the 200 amp fuse then connected to one high current terminal of the contactor;

The other high current terminal of the contactor should then be connected to B+ of the Curtis Controller. From B+ of the Curtis controller, we can have a cable to A1 on the Series Wound DC Motor;

12 Volt Circuitry

The original plan was to use the DC-DC convertor so that we could get a 12 volt supply from the 48volt traction battery pack. For some reason, we could not get the DC-DC convertor to work. We ended up using a 12 volt auxiliary battery which was independent of the traction battery pack. The way the 12 volt circuitry was connected was as follows:

a wire with an inline fuse was connected from the positive terminal of the 12 volt battery to the key switch. In our case, we did not have a key switch, but a switch. I m not sure if we had a polarity protection diode between the fuse and the switch (as I was not involved in the 12 volt circuitry), but if there isn t one, there should be one;

another wire was hooked up from the other terminal of the switch to the com terminal of the pot box.

another wire was hooked up from the NC (normally closed) terminal of the pot box to the positive terminal on the contactor control circuit and another wire going to terminal 1 on the Curtis controller;

a wire was hooked up from the negative terminal of the 12 volt auxiliary battery to the negative terminal of the on the contactor control circuit;

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the 2 wires from the pot box were connected to the terminals 2 and 3 on the Curtis controller.

As we were utilizing bits of the existing wiring harness that came with the buggy prior to doing this EV conversion, there was a bit of confusion during the wiring up of the 12 volt circuitry, mainly due to one end of the wiring was a different color to the other end which caused. Once, this was sorted, the EV buggy worked and I can assure you that I took it for a drive, along with the other students. I will have a write up on how it drives.

What I Learned From The Gas (Petrol) to Electric Conversion Experience?

During the Gas (Petrol) to Electric Conversion Experience, I learned quite a number of things, even though I had already done an EV Conversion (see Electric Go Kart story ).  Some of the things learned were:

Why Series Wound DC Motors turn in one direction only, even when the polarity of the power applied to them is swapped;

How to reverse the direction of a Series Wound DC Motor;

Registration requirements for Electric Car Conversions and EV Conversions in New South Wales (NSW), Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia;

Working out what components to get and how to calculate the rating of each component;

Electric arc welding techniques, courtesy of fellow students;

How to wire up a Curtis Controller;

How to bench test components prior to installation;

Electrical theory;

EV (Electric Vehicle) theory;

Conclusion

The Gas (Petrol) to Electric Conversion Course was a success. Although we took a day longer than expected, the Electric Buggy drives and there will be a write up on it.

This is Crazy Al signing out

P.S. Please book mark this page and come back to it as the write up on the completed EV will done in the next few days.

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